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20130113
20130121
Search Results 0 to 8 of about 9 (some duplicates have been removed)
of our schools. they're not military encampments. they're safe environments in which the children feel very secure around with that kind of protection. you think about, in your country, england has an armed presence for international flights going in and out of england in a very sensitive environment called an airplane. post-9/11, people said guns have no place in the cockpit or in the passenger planes. but in fact, they have worked very well because they're trained. >> actually, let me pick you up on that. what's been effective on planes is an outright ban on any weapons, any guns. that's what's been effective. the reason you dont see people using guns on planes is they have been banned. this brings me to the point of what i have been trying to get to on this show, which is it's not about removing everybody's guns in america. it's a complete fallacy when people spin out that line. it's designed, i think, to instill the kind of fear president obama talked about today. trying to make people think, oh, my god, they're coming for my gun. and what happens is a lot of americans buy more of
to have buzz-in doors, that infrastructure is part of creating safe secure learning environments. and then being able to really look at the personnel that you have in your school that helps support students. from training for teachers in the classroom to the other adults who are in the classroom because there are so many adults there besides the classrooms the classroom teachers the school bus drivers, the janitors, you know, the shooting at the high school in california, it was a teacher and a campus supervisor who really talked down that student and prevented lots of further violence. that kind of training is critically important. i mean, look at in this time of crisis when states have slashed budgets and taken so many resources out of schools, some of those resources are school counsellors, school psychologists, social workers, and now, where you might have had a school counselor per school, maybe dealing with two or 300, some of the ratios now for school psychologists, for example, is one to 1,000. you can't possibly provide the kind of support
, but making some judgments. you're going to have a consensus which is more typical of the urban environment. you're going to go into -- let's get back to laura. let's go back to bring the communities in and around or, colorado, what i think is an important conversation because i think you will find there is probably more consensus around the country for what we refer to as responsible common-sense gun legislation that complement's. we will also find in republican areas a lot of support for after-school programs. you will find a lot of that. so i think part of the way you get good at continuing that conversation, i would say that you dispel the cultural barriers. is very different to your reaction in montana. >> came to the staff to go fishing. as kid to my branch manager who is an avid outdoorsman and quite a political, owns a lot of guns but primarily traditional bow hunter. i said, rham emmanuel is coming. oh, my god. i've got to go hide my guns. and we left about this. they're going to love your guns. >> the secret service. >> the secret service came and they spend a lot of time. they ca
typical of the urban environment that you're going to go into -- let's go back to aurora. those covering communities around aurora, colorado that it is an important conversation because they're sore consensus around the country above refer to its gun legislation that complements other things. it was defined in republican areas a lot of support for afterschool. the further away you get in continuing the conversation i would say you dispel a breakdown of cultural barriers because there are differences, your ranch in montana. >> on came to my ranch to go fishing and i said to my ranch manager, who is an avid outdoorsman and quite apolitical, owns a lot of guns, but primarily a traditional bow hunter. i say trade when it's coming at us to the has chief of staff ms. brittany secret service detail within. said i've got to go make a spirit i said no, they are going to let their guns. the secret service came and spent a lot of time and came back on other occasions to go fishiness in the secret service had my ranch manager bonded over it. >> respect do not and i don't want to use your ranch incom
for silence and the environment host as forum on the disasters and environment. after remarks by fema director craig fugate, the lessons will focus on hurricane katrina, the ongoing drought and earthquake in japan on c-span 3 at 8:30 eastern. on c-span 2 at 9:00 a.m. eastern, a brookings institution conference on innovation and the economy. panelists in the day long event are scheduled to include the presidents and c.e.o.'s of alcoa, procter & gamble and nike. >> he had been talking about this dream he'd had. he talked about it for years, the american dream, and that it had become his dream and he had been in detroit just a few months before and he had talked about, you know, i have a dream that america will some day realize these principles and the declaration of independence. so i think he was just inspired by that moment. >> sunday on "after words" clayborn carson recalls his journey as a civil rights activist participating in the march on washington. it's part of three days of book tv this weekend, monday, featuring authors and books on the inauguration, president obama and martin luther k
to help 8000 schools to train teachers and staff to create safer environments. when it comes to mental health, more money, provided $55 million for new initiative to make sure students get mental treatment. $25 million for state base strategies supporting individuals age 16-25 with mental health or substance abuse issues. another $25 million to offer students mental-health services for trauma or anxiety. $50 million to train 5000 additional mental health professionals serving children and young adults. those are the items the washington post as identified that congressional action would be necessary. as we go throughout the morning, a lot of editorials from this morning's papers. we were reports of those as well. we take your calls and get your thoughts, jeff is a gun owner from missouri. thank you for holding. go ahead. caller: the sun is just coming up here, and it has been up for you a little bit. i wanted to address the. a lot of people -- the point a lot of people forget. the second amendment was put into place to protect people from being observed by a corrupt government. if we d
after the fact, social services, an unsafe environment, but that does not get at the issue. they have to be creative sometimes to do that. in regards to domestic violence, absolutely. here is what we can do. forgive me for saying the obvious, ncic is a wonderful thing. anything with a serial number goes in there, like a toaster. it is not necessarily a go to database to get what we want to get at. i think you are right on. those people should go into the next system right away. what we need is funding for crisis teams. a lot of times, someone needs help and an officer rolls up at 3:00 in the morning and they are very limited in the resources available to them. if there is funding for properly trained crisis intervention people, there we go. now we have got something. now it is the mental health e r and the offices do not have to try to be creative or drive away because there is nothing they can do. was there another question? >> i wanted to add one thing. i am not an expert in mental health. i just want to say in any comprehensive package, including appropriate funding for increased a
Search Results 0 to 8 of about 9 (some duplicates have been removed)